Philippines: Compressive Strength and Economic Viability of Roller-Compacted Concrete Pavement

 on Saturday, November 14, 2015  

Roller Compacted Concrete
Roller Compacted Concrete 

Pavement industry is one of the areas where sustainability must be practiced, maintaining a balance in the economic viability and the environmental and social obligations of a particular pavement project. Manufacturing portland cement is a very intensive process and emits a significant amount of CO2 in the environment. But recently, advances in the technology and cement production processes have greatly decreased these impacts. Furthermore, some modern concrete for pavements uses less portland cement per cubic unit compared to the past cement ratio of the same volume, and thus lowering the carbon footprints discharged to the environment. 

Roller-Compacted Concrete (RCC) is a new engineering material having the same basic ingredients as the conventional concrete but of different mix proportions. RCC is constructed without forms, dowels, or reinforcing steel bars and of lesser water-cement ratio compared to conventional concrete.

Roller Compacted Concrete
Materials Used in RCC

Roller Compacted Concrete
Materials used in RCC


Roller-Compacted Concrete technology is yet to be discovered in the Philippines, but in other countries especially in North America and Canada, RCC pavements have been making history for the past 30 years. RCC technology has provided both the private and government sectors their need for access roads, parking lots, intermodal shipping yards, ports, and loading docks, truck or freight terminals, bulk commodity storage, and distribution centers, and many other typical applications (Harrington, Abdo, Adaska & Hazaree, 2010). 

Savings associated with RCC over conventional concrete are primarily due to reduced cement content, reduced forming and placement costs, and reduced construction times. Moreover, RCC needs no forms or finishing, and there are no dowels, tie rods, or steel reinforcement (Harrington, Abdo, Adaska & Hazaree, 2010). 

Some of the specific advantages of RCC from a sustainability viewpoint include low initial cost and rapid construction compared to both conventionally designed concrete pavements of similar structural capacity, low lifecycle economic costs. It has the ability to integrate variable quantity of recycled and industrial byproduct material (RIBM) into the mix, and high surface reflectivity. Due to its lower water-cement ratio, the carbon footprint is reduced (Dam et al., 2011). 


Roller Compacted Concrete
Basic Difference in Composition of RCC and PCC

Roller Compacted Concrete
Compressive Strength of RCC vs. PCC Pavement

By using industrial residuals like fly ash as a partial substitute for cement, this study reduced the use of non-renewable resources and minimized the impact of CO2 to the environment. With these characteristics of RCC, this study can be a significant aid in the Philippine economy and the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH) of the Philippine Government and private sectors in providing the country a more sustainable and cost effective pavement. In the Philippines, this research will be a benchmark in exploring the promising technology and advantages of roller compacted concrete pavement and in determining its applicability for local use.



Philippines: Compressive Strength and Economic Viability of Roller-Compacted Concrete Pavement 4.5 5 Carmel Sabado Saturday, November 14, 2015 Roller Compacted Concrete  Pavement industry is one of the areas where sustainability must be practiced, maintaining a balance in the...


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